Inspired by the collections of the National Museum of Scotland, author Doug Johnstone will lead this workshop on writing crime fiction.

Doug has published eight novels, most recently Crash Land (Faber & Faber). His novel The Jump, was a finalist for the McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Novel of the Year in 2016.

Designed for aspiring crime fiction authors of all levels, this workshop will focus on developing essential skills in crime writing and explore the techniques behind character, plot, dialogue, pacing and atmosphere.

#RebusFest

  • Carte-de-visite depicting Dr. Edward William Pritchard, who was notorious for poisoning his wife and mother-in-law. This crime which made him the last person the be publicly executed in Glasgow, by Cramb Brothers, Glasgow.

    Carte-de-visite depicting Dr. Edward William Pritchard, who was notorious for poisoning his wife and mother-in-law. This crime which made him the last person the be publicly executed in Glasgow, by Cramb Brothers, Glasgow.
  • Eight of the 17 miniature coffins discovered on Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh almost 200 years ago. Each coffin, only 95mm in length, contained a little wooden figure, expertly carved and dressed in custom-made clothes that had been stitched and glued around them.

    Eight of the 17 miniature coffins discovered on Arthur's Seat  in Edinburgh almost 200 years ago. Each coffin, only 95mm in length, contained a little wooden figure, expertly carved and dressed in custom-made clothes that had been stitched and glued around them.
  • The Maiden, 1564 - 1710 AD. Long before the French Revolution, the Scots had invented and were using a beheading machine known as the Maiden. During the 145 years it was used, the Maiden claimed over 150 victims.

    The Maiden, 1564 - 1710 AD. Long before the French Revolution, the Scots had invented and were using a beheading machine known as the Maiden. During the 145 years it was used, the Maiden claimed over 150 victims.
  • Mortsafe from Airth, Stirlingshire, 1831. Grieving relatives, desperate to protect their dead from the ‘resurrectionists’, would encase coffins in locked iron mortsafes for the first six weeks after burial. Those who couldn’t afford the cost would set up vigil in the graveyard instead.

    Mortsafe from Airth, Stirlingshire, 1831. Grieving relatives, desperate to protect their dead from the ‘resurrectionists’, would encase coffins in locked iron mortsafes for the first six weeks after burial. Those who couldn’t afford the cost would set up vigil in the graveyard instead.
  • This iron collar, from Kingskettle in Fife, was bolted through the bottom of a coffin and around the neck of a corpse, to prevent it being removed by resurrectionists. c. 1820.

    This iron collar, from Kingskettle in Fife, was bolted through the bottom of a coffin and around the neck of a corpse, to prevent it being removed by resurrectionists. c. 1820.
  • Death dancing to the music of a samisen played by a girl. Okimono of carved ivory, unsigned: Japan

    Death dancing to the music of a samisen played by a girl. Okimono of carved ivory, unsigned: Japan

 

Written in Blood is part of RebusFest, a weekend of events celebrating the 30th anniversary of Ian Rankin's Rebus novels. For more information please visit ianrankin.net/rebusfest/

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Explore our collections

Explore stories, films, games and resources from the museums’ collections.
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Event information

When

1 Jul 2017
11:00 – 16:00 (doors open 10:45)

Where

Seminar Room, Learning Centre, Level 4

How much

£45, £40 Members & Conc.

Booking information

Age 18+

Booking available online, in person and by telephone on 0300 123 6789. 

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