Here you can find updates on the Military Collections and the British Empire Project including object stories and summaries of our workshops and events.

Dividing the Spoils: Perspectives on military collecting and the British Empire

Find out more about our edited volume, published by Manchester University Press.

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International Workshop

Our international workshop drew together speakers from a wide range of disciplines, and invited regimental, corps and service museum curators to discuss collecting cultures in military contexts beyond the parameters of the project, as well as contemporary themes including issues of reparation and return.

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A relic of General Charles Gordon

A fascinating example of a military relic can be seen in the collections of the Royal Engineers Museum in Chatham, Kent.

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Advisory Board Meeting at the National Museum of World Cultures, Leiden

On 28 November 2018, colleagues from our Advisory Board met at the National Museum of World Cultures in Leiden to discuss how the project has progressed since our last meeting.

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The box that went on the March to Kandahar

Here we examine a decorated wooden box in the collections of the Highlanders Museum that was purchased as a souvenir from Afghanistan in 1880.

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Kunwar Singh’s Silver Fly Whisk

One of the aims of the project is to begin to untangle the many ways in which objects come into museum collections. Here we investigate the provenance of a fly whisk associated with the Indian Uprising of 1857-8.

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Knowledge Exchange Workshop: Reconsidering Ethnographic Collections in Regimental Museums

On 11 September 2018 we held our first knowledge exchange workshop at the National Army Museum with a group of curators from different regimental museums across the United Kingdom.

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A Silver Mounted Asante Gourd

One of the first objects in the military collections of National Museums Scotland that we examined in greater detail for the Military Collecting and Empire project is the ‘Asante Gourd’.

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