Tickets now on sale Exhibition National Museum of Scotland

Wild and Majestic: Romantic Visions of Scotland

26 Jun - 10 Nov 2019

Exhibition Gallery 1, Level 3

Ticketed, Members free

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Dramatic highland landscapes, heroic histories, tartan and bagpipes are among the defining images of Scotland for many people around the world today. This exhibition considers the origins of these ideas and explores how they were used to represent Scotland around the world.


Pricing

Members free
Adult £10
Over 60s £8.50
Student, Unemployed, Disabled* £7.50
Child (5–15) £7.50, Under 5s free
* Valid ID required. Carers of disabled people free.

From the Romantic movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries to Queen Victoria’s highland idyll at Balmoral, Wild and Majestic considers the origins of these ideas and explores how they were used to represent Scotland around the world, expressed through highland and military dress, royal visits, art, literature and the beginnings of the Scottish tourism industry.

John Knox, 'Landscape with Tourists at Loch Katrin', oil on canvas, 1815 © National Galleries of Scotland.

 

Featuring rich displays and iconic objects, this landmark exhibition charts Scotland’s journey into the global imagination and invites you to think again about the meaning and relevance of ideas that continue to define Scotland today. 

  • Painting of the Laird of Grant's Piper, William Cumming by Richard Waitt, 1714.

    Painting of the Laird of Grant's Piper, William Cumming by Richard Waitt, 1714.

  • John Knox, 'Landscape with Tourists at Loch Katrin', oil on canvas, 1815 © National Galleries of Scotland.

    John Knox, 'Landscape with Tourists at Loch Katrin', oil on canvas, 1815 © National Galleries of Scotland.

  • Ledgers of tartan samples formed by the Highland Society of London, c. 1820.

    Ledgers of tartan samples formed by the Highland Society of London, c. 1820.

  • Glass used at the banquet given in honour of George IV during his visit to Edinburgh in 1822.

    Glass used at the banquet given in honour of George IV during his visit to Edinburgh in 1822.

  • Part of the uniform of a member of the Royal Company of Archers c1820.

    Part of the uniform of a member of the Royal Company of Archers c1820.

  • Set of Highland bagpipes of laburnum, silver and ivory mounted, with Royal Stewart tartan cover, Edinburgh c1850.

    Set of Highland bagpipes of laburnum, silver and ivory mounted, with Royal Stewart tartan cover, Edinburgh c1850.

  • Silver plaid brooch set with a cairngorm in the centre and a ring of sixteen carbuncles round it, worn by the chiefs of Clanranald, mid-19th century.

    Silver plaid brooch set with a cairngorm in the centre and a ring of sixteen carbuncles round it, worn by the chiefs of Clanranald, mid-19th century.

  • Sword of MacGregor of MacGregor, worn at 1822 visit Scottish, Edinburgh, probably by Marshall and Son, c1822.

    Sword of MacGregor of MacGregor, worn at 1822 visit Scottish, Edinburgh, probably by Marshall and Son, c1822.

  • John Knox, 'Landscape with Tourists at Loch Katrin', oil on canvas, 1815 © National Galleries of Scotland.

    John Knox, 'Landscape with Tourists at Loch Katrin', oil on canvas, 1815 © National Galleries of Scotland.

National Museums Scotland has partnered with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig College on Skye, part of the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), on the production of content for the exhibition. Gaelic language and culture feature throughout the exhibition, with the main narrative presented in both English and Gaelic. 

Each section of the exhibition will include exploration of themes from a Gaelic-cultural perspective, and throughout the exhibition filmed interviews will reflect a range of perspectives, including Gaelic voices, on some contested historical themes about the period.

The relationship between objects and the history of the Gaelic language will be shown through a rich selection of material.

The Red Book of Clanranald

Above: The Red Book of Clanranald, written in Gaelic by the bards of Clanranald in the 17th and 18th centuries, containing poems and the traditional genealogy and history of the Macdonalds, one of the manuscripts which James McPherson consulted whilst researching Ossian.

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Getting here

National Museum of Scotland
Chambers Street
Edinburgh
EH1 1JF

 

Map and directions

Access

There is level access to the Museum via the main doors to the Entrance Hall on Chambers Street and the Tower entrance at the corner of Chambers Street and George IV Bridge. Lifts are available to all floors and accessible toilets are available on most floors, as well as a Changing Places (U) toilet in the Entrance Hall on Level 0. Guide dogs, hearing dogs and other recognised assistance dogs are admitted. You can find more access information here.

Sponsored by

Baillie Gifford Investment Managers

Part of

Edinburgh Art Festival

Header image: Colonel William Gordon of Fyvie by Pompeo Battoni © National Trust for Scotland, Fyvie Castle.

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