Skip Navigation or Skip to Content
Online Events National Museum of Scotland

The Galloway Hoard: A Decade of Discovery

11 Sep 2024
19:30 - 20:30

Online

Free with optional donation

Book now
3 decorative pieces of goldwork against a black background

Gold filigree “aestels” from The Galloway Hoard. Image © National Museums Scotland

Gold filigree “aestels” from The Galloway Hoard. Image © National Museums Scotland

A decade on, join us as we celebrate the discovery of the Galloway Hoard and share new findings.  

The Galloway Hoard, buried around AD 900, was discovered by a metal detectorist on 1 September 2014 in Kirkcudbrightshire. It was allocated to National Museums Scotland in 2017 after a successful fundraising campaign supported by the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund. 

The Galloway Hoard was hailed as a remarkable Viking-age treasure and, in the ten years since its discovery, has been analysed by experts from across the globe. The Hoard has not only provided researchers with a window into an early medieval world of vast horizons and networks, but also intimate family heirlooms and sacred relics.  

In this live online event, many of the experts who have studied the Galloway Hoard will discuss the unique insights it has revealed, and will share a vision for its future.  

The event includes a live Q&A chaired by writer and broadcaster Sally Magnusson.

Dr Martin Goldberg is Principal Curator of Medieval Archaeology and History at National Museums Scotland. Martin’s involvement with the Galloway Hoard began in 2017 when National Museums Scotland was allocated the Hoard by SAFAP, the Scottish Archaeological Finds Allocation Panel, through the Treasure Trove process. Martin was part of the team that fundraised the £1.98 million to save the Hoard for the nation. Since then, he has been leading the effort to research and conserve this incredible find.  

Dr Adrián Maldonado and Dr Mary Davis are Galloway Hoard Researchers for the Unwrapping the Galloway Hoard project, a partnership between National Museums Scotland and the University of Glasgow as part of a £1 million research project supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Adrián is an expert on Viking and early medieval archaeology. Mary is a conservator and material scientist.  

Sally Magnusson is an author and broadcaster. Her debut novel, The Sealwoman's Gift, is set in Iceland in the 17th century. In her memoir Dreaming of Iceland: The Lure of a Family Legend she traces - by way of several generations of her own family - the country's development from an impoverished, isolated colony of Denmark to the self-assured independent nation it is now.

Additional information

  • This event is suitable for ages 14+. 
  • Please note that you only need to book one ticket (either an attendee ticket or an attendee with donation ticket) per household/email address. 
  • The event will be hosted on Zoom, the third-party provider we use to broadcast our online events. Prior to the event you will receive an email from Zoom which will include your personal link to join the event. To learn how Zoom processes your personal data, please see their privacy notice.  
  • The event will include automatic captioning.
  • The event will be recorded, but your cameras and microphones will automatically be switched off. 
  • The event recording will be made available on catch-up.  
  • If you have any queries about this event, please contact publicevents@nms.ac.uk

This event includes automatic captioning.

National Museums Scotland have a non-refundable and non-transferable ticketing policy. Please refer to our full Ticketing Terms and Conditions here.

We use a third-party provider, Zoom Video Communications Inc, to broadcast our online events.  Prior to the event you will receive an email from Zoom which will include your personal link to join the event. For more information on how they process your personal data, please see Zoom's privacy notice.

For information on how we manage your personal data please see our full privacy notice.

UKRI Arts and Humanities Research council logo

You may be interested in

Back to top