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One of Britain's oldest, most distinctive, and best-known breeds, with a long, thick, flowing coat of rich hair and majestic sweeping horns, the Highlander has remained largely unchanged over the centuries.

Origins

Highland cattle originated in the western isles of Scotland. They are hardy and normally live outdoors all year round. They have a double coat of hair - a long oily outer layer and a soft thick undercoat. They have long horns: the females' horns point forward and the males' point forward and down.

Airgead II and Ceo V

National Museum of Rural Life, East Kilbride © Ruth Armstrong Photography

Christmas present

Our two Highland heifers at the National Museum of Rural Life, East Kilbride arrived on 29 November 2016.  Their Gaelic names are taken from their mothers to preserve the identity of their female lineage. 

Airgead II was born on 6 April 2016. Airgead means 'silver' She is the lighter coloured of the two.  Dun coloured Ceo V was born on 6 May 2016. Ceo is the Gaelic word for mist.

  • Ceo V (left) and Airgead II (right) on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

    Ceo V (left) and Airgead II (right) on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

  • Airgead II on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

    Airgead II on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

  • Ceo V on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

    Ceo V on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

  • Airgead II and Ceo V with the sheep on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

    Airgead II and Ceo V with the sheep on the Wester Kittochside farm © Ruth Armstrong Photography

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