The aeroplanes, autogyros and hang-gliders in our Civil Aviation Hangar represent a range of different uses of civilian aircraft, from aerial photography to flying for fun, delivering goods to delivering babies!

de Havilland Puss Moth

The Puss Moth was a three-seat light aircraft built between 1929 and 1933. The wings could be folded for storage and it was claimed that the aircraft could fit into a domestic garage.

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Weir W-2

The Weir W-2 is an autogyro. It is similar to a helicopter, but the rotor on top is not powered by the engine.

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Spartan Cruiser forward fuselage

The Spartan Cruiser I was developed in 1932 from the Saro-Percival Mailplane, which carried airmail.

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Miles M.18

The M.18 was a light civil aircraft. Only four were ever built, between 1938 and 1942.

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General Aircraft Cygnet

The Cygnet was the first light aircraft made in Britain with all-metal construction. Only 11 were built, between 1936 and 1941.

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de Havilland Dragon

The Dragon operated many air routes within Scotland during the 1930s. Most of the airlines in Scotland at that time flew Dragons.

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Avro Anson

The Anson entered service in 1935. It was used by the Royal Air Force at the start of the Second World War for anti-submarine patrols.

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Slingsby T.38 Grasshopper

The Grasshopper was a basic training glider used by the Air Training Corps in Britain between 1952 and the late 1980s.

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de Havilland Dove

The Dove was a short-haul airliner which entered airline service in 1946. It was one of Britain’s most successful airliners with more than 500 built between 1946 and 1967. It was exported all over the world.

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Beech E-18S

This E-18S is a passenger airliner, built in Wichita, Kansas, in 1955. It was converted to a nine-seat layout in 1968 for the Scottish airline, Loganair.

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Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer

The Twin Pioneer was built by Scottish Aviation at Prestwick in Ayrshire between 1955 and 1962.

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Schleicher Ka-4 Rhönlerche

The Rhönlerche was designed as a cheap and simple two-seat training glider. It was widely used at gliding clubs throughout Europe from 1955 onwards.

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Druine Turbulent

The Turbulent was designed by Frenchman Roger Druine in the 1950s as a homebuild microlight aircraft.

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Britten-Norman Islander

The Islander has connected island communities in Scotland since entering service in 1967.

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Scot-Kites Cirrus III

The Cirrus III hang glider was originally developed by the Electra Flyer Corporation in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the USA in 1975.

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Firebird Sierra 2

The Sierra hang glider, developed in 1983, has an innovative wing design.

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Airwave Magic Kiss

The Magic Kiss hang glider was first produced in 1989 and quickly became a standard hang gliding club aircraft.

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Montgomerie-Parsons

The Montgomerie-Parsons is an autogyro. It is similar to a helicopter, but the rotor on top is not powered by the engine.

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Ikarus C42

The C42 is a microlight, an aeroplane with a maximum take-off weight of 450 kg (992 lb).

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