See iconic civil and military aircraft in the air display at Scotland's National Airshow on Saturday 28 July 2018.

Hispano Aviación HA-1112 M1L Buchón

In 1942 the Spanish government arranged to build Messerschmitt Bf 109G-2 aircraft under licence. The intention was for some parts to be supplied by Germany, although this was during the Second World War and Germany could not produce sufficient aero engines for their own needs. In the end, Spanish-built engines were fitted. The first of these aircraft, designated HA-1109 K1L, made its first flight in March 1945.

Above: Hispano Aviación HA-1112 M1L Buchón © George Romain

The ultimate version of the Spanish-built Messerschmitt 109 was the HA-1112 M1L, known as the Buchón or male dove. These were fitted with Rolls-Royce Merlin 500 engines. They were used by the Spanish Air Force to provide air power in the control of overseas territories in Africa from the mid-1950s until 1965.

The Buchón is probably best known for its role in the 1969 film, Battle of Britain, where it was used widely to represent the Messerschmitt Bf 109. Buchóns have played this role in a number of other war films, including the 1990 film, Memphis Belle, and most recently in the 2017 film, Dunkirk.

Hughes OH-6A Cayuse 'Loach'

The OH-6 was designed for use as a military scout during the Vietnam war to meet the US Army’s need for an extremely manoeuvrable light observation helicopter. 

This aircraft, Loach 011, was manufactured in 1969 and was number 470 off the production line. It was shipped direct to Vietnam where it served in the 20th Transportation Company. During a mission on 17 August 1970, the aircraft came under fire in South Vietnam and took 11 hits from small arms and automatic weapons. The majority of these hits were on the underside of the aircraft causing damage to the fuel system and some aircraft components. Luckily the armour plating protected the flight crew and only one was wounded in action.

Above: Hughes OH-6A Cayuse 'Loach © George Romain

After Vietnam, Loach 011 carried out National Guard duties including work with the Drug Enforcement Agency, before being auctioned off on 4 May 2004. It was alter purchased and restored by Phil Connolly who decided it would be ideal to fit into his helicopter activities and business in the UK. The aircraft was returned to its Vietnam paint scheme. The civilian interior was replaced with a military interior and various ex-military components were re-fitted to restore it to its original specification.

The name ‘Loach’ comes from Light Observation And Combat Helicopter.

Red Arrows

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic team, better known as the Red Arrows, is widely considered to be the best acrobatic team in the world.  Formed in 1985, the team originally flew Folland Gnats but these were replaced with the current aircraft, the British Aerospace Hawk T.1A for the 1980 display season. The only Red Arrows Hawk T.1A on display in a UK museum can now be seen alongside Scotland's Concorde at National Museum of Flight.

Above: Red Arrows Hawk T.1A XX308 is now on permanent display alongside Concorde at the National Museum of Flight, East Fortune Airfield.

This year the team is led by Red 1 who this year is Scottish born Squadron Leader Martin Pert. He was commissioned into the RAF in 2000 through the Sixth-Form Scholarship scheme. As Team Leader he is primarily responsible for all aspects of the display, from running the training programme to choreographing the show. He leads the nine-aircraft aerobatic display.

Bristol Blenheim 

The Blenheim was developed in 1936 from a high-speed transport aircraft built for Lord Rothermere, owner if several newspapers.  It was designed by Frank Barnwell a Scotsman who was the chief designer for the Bristol Aeroplane Company.  

The Blenheim entered service with the Royal Air Force in 1937, two years before the outbreak of the Second World War. Although it was designed as a light bomber, the Blenheim was also used as a long-range fighter and night fighter. 

Above: Second World War Bristol Blenheim © George Romain, Aircraft Restoration Company

An improved version of the Blenheim, the Mk IV was developed with a  longer nose to give more room for the bomb aimer. These entered RAF service in 1939.

The Mk IV was also manufactured in Canada, where it was called the Bolingbroke. A Bolingbroke that was used for aircrew training in Canada is on display in the National Museum of Flight's Military Aviation Hangar.

SB Lim-2 (MiG-15UTI) 

This aircraft is actually the SB Lim-2, a Polish-built version of the Russian MiG-15UTI two-seat trainer produced by WSK Mielec in 1952.  The aircraft is operated by the Norwegian Air Force Historical Squadron as a representative of the Cold War 'enemy'. The MiG-15 was one of the first successful jet fighters to incorporate swept wings to achieve speeds close to the speed of sound. 

A Czechoslovakian version of this aircraft, the AeroS-103 can be seen in the National Museum of Flight's  Military Aviation hangar.

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Scotland's National Airshow 2018

Book tickets for Scotland’s National Airshow 2018 for a day of breathtaking aerial displays on Saturday 28 July.
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Airshow directions

Navigate your way to Scotland's National Airshow on Saturday 28 July at the National Museum of Flight, East Fortune Airfield.
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Things to see and do

There's an eclectic mix of aerial display and on the ground activity for Scotland's National Airshow on Saturday 28 July 2018.
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Airshow terms and conditions

Join us at Scotland’s National Airshow 2018 for a day of breathtaking aerial displays on Saturday 28 July.
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Hints and Tips

All you need to know to have a successful trip at Scotland's National Airshow on Saturday 28 July 2018.
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Call 0300 123 6789 or book online

Airshow terms and conditions

Book tickets

Book parking

Book programme

Pricing

Members
Until 13 July

Adult £16/Concession £14.50*
Child 5-15 years £8 (under 5s free)
Family (2 adults, 2 children) £41.50

Early Bird
Until 13 July

Adult £19/Concession £17.50*
Child 5-15 years £9.50 (under 5s free)
Family (2 adults, 2 children) £49

Full price
From 14 July

Adult £23/Concession £20
Child 5-15 years £11 (under 5s free)
Family (2 adults, 2 children) £58

Car parking £5

Programme £5

* 60+, students with valid NUS or Young Scot card, unemployed with ID, disabled people. Carers of disabled people free.

 

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