Autistic young adults are invited to come and enjoy exclusive after hours access to our new exhibition Scotland’s Early Silver.

Young adults (suggested age range 14+) who are on the autistic spectrum are invited to come and enjoy exclusive after hours access to our new exhibition Scotland’s Early Silver with their parents, carers or support workers. 

This stunning exhibition explores the impact of silver during the first millennium AD from Roman times through to the Vikings’ after the sentence that ends with support workers.

The includes an introduction to the exhibition from our curator Alice Blackwell and a chance to ask her questions.

  • Piece of hacked Roman silver from Traprain Law.

    Piece of hacked Roman silver from Traprain Law.
  • Portion of a silver-gilt penannular brooch decorated with animal heads with bared teeth, Pictish, from St Ninian's Isle, Shetland, 8th century.

    Portion of a silver-gilt penannular brooch decorated with animal heads with bared teeth, Pictish, from St Ninian's Isle, Shetland, 8th century.
  • Half of a shallow silver bowl decorated with the head of Hercules, and featuring hunting scenes on the outside, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.

    Half of a shallow silver bowl decorated with the head of Hercules, and featuring hunting scenes on the outside, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.
  • Massive silver chain, made from pairs of solid links and fastened with a penannular clasp decorated with Pictish symbols, from Parkhill, Aberdeenshire, AD 400–600.

    Massive silver chain, made from pairs of solid links and fastened with a penannular clasp decorated with Pictish symbols, from Parkhill, Aberdeenshire, AD 400–600.
  • Silver handles in the shape of a leopard, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.

    Silver handles in the shape of a leopard, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.
  • Hunterston Brooch, a solid silver brooch covered in a thin layer of gold, from Hunterston, Ayrshire, AD 650–750.

    Hunterston Brooch, a solid silver brooch covered in a thin layer of gold, from Hunterston, Ayrshire, AD 650–750.
  • Silver chainwith a penannular clasp from Borland Farm, Walston, Lanarkshire.

    Silver chainwith a penannular clasp from Borland Farm, Walston, Lanarkshire.
  • Silver pennanular brooch with gilded interlaced ornamentation, from Rogart, Sutherland, AD 700–800.

    Silver pennanular brooch with gilded interlaced ornamentation, from Rogart, Sutherland, AD 700–800.
  • Roman coin hoard found at Birnie, Elgin, Moray.

    Roman coin hoard found at Birnie, Elgin, Moray.
  • Part of a flat silver plate showing Venus rising from the waves, from Traprain Law, 410 - 425 AD and fragments of two other silver plates.

    Part of a flat silver plate showing Venus rising from the waves, from Traprain Law, 410 - 425 AD and fragments of two other silver plates.
  • Part of a hacked and squashed beast-headed brooch from the Gaulcross hoard, Aberdeenshire.

    Part of a hacked and squashed beast-headed brooch from the Gaulcross hoard, Aberdeenshire.
  • Silver spoon bowl decorated with an engraved fish engraved, from Traprain Law, 410 - 425 AD.

    Silver spoon bowl decorated with an engraved fish engraved, from Traprain Law, 410 - 425 AD.
  • Silver pins from Norrie’s Law, Fife and Covesea, Moray.

    Silver pins from Norrie’s Law, Fife and Covesea, Moray.
Explore more

Exhibition
Scotland's Early Silver

This stunning exhibition explores the impact of silver during the first millennium AD.
More

Event
Early Doors for Autism: Silver Shimmer

Exclusive access for autistic children to our Scotland's Early Silver exhibition plus Christmas Crafts.
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Story
Norrie's Law hoard

This early medieval silver, unearthed in Fife during the 19th century, is one of the largest Pictish hoards ever to be found.
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Story
St Ninian's Isle treasure

Unearth a fascinating Pictish treasure trove.
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Story
Traprain Law treasure

Buried around the middle of the 5th century AD, this hoard of Roman silver from Traprain Law in East Lothian is the largest known from outside the Roman Empire.
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Event information

When

23 Oct 2017
17:30-19:00

Where

National Museum of Scotland

How much

Free

Booking information

For further information and to book a place please contact Laura Bennison, Community Engagement Officer by calling 0131 247 4435 or emailing l.bennison@nms.ac.uk

Please come to the tower entrance of the National Museum of Scotland. This is on the corner of Chambers Street opposite Greyfriar’s Bobby. EH1 1JF

Please wait in the Tower Entrance where we will meet you and show you upstairs to the exhibition on level 3.

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