This stunning exhibition explores the impact of silver during the first millennium AD.

#EarlySilver

Silver was the most precious metal in Scotland for a thousand years. The exhibition tells the story of this powerful material during a pivotal time, from the arrival of the Roman army until the dawn of the Viking Age. Featuring jewellery, vessels, coins and other finds, the exhibition examines silver through changing times, as Roman Iron Age tribal societies gave way to a patchwork of early medieval kingdoms.

  • Silver handles in the shape of a leopard, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.

    Silver handles in the shape of a leopard, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.
  • Hunterston Brooch, a solid silver brooch covered in a thin layer of gold, from Hunterston, Ayrshire, AD 650–750.

    Hunterston Brooch, a solid silver brooch covered in a thin layer of gold, from Hunterston, Ayrshire, AD 650–750.
  • Silver pennanular brooch with gilded interlaced ornamentation, from Rogart, Sutherland, AD 700–800.

    Silver pennanular brooch with gilded interlaced ornamentation, from Rogart, Sutherland, AD 700–800.
  • Half of a shallow silver bowl decorated with the head of Hercules, and featuring hunting scenes on the outside, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.

    Half of a shallow silver bowl decorated with the head of Hercules, and featuring hunting scenes on the outside, from Traprain Law, East Lothian, AD 410–425.
  • Massive silver chain, made from pairs of solid links and fastened with a penannular clasp decorated with Pictish symbols, from Parkhill, Aberdeenshire, AD 400–600.

    Massive silver chain, made from pairs of solid links and fastened with a penannular clasp decorated with Pictish symbols, from Parkhill, Aberdeenshire, AD 400–600.
  • Portion of a silver pennanular brooch, ornamented with gold filigree and amber settings, from Dunbeath, Caithness, AD 650–750.

    Portion of a silver pennanular brooch, ornamented with gold filigree and amber settings, from Dunbeath, Caithness, AD 650–750.


Scotland’s Early Silver
follows three years of research supported by The Glenmorangie Company.

Glenmorangie

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Feature
Glenmorangie Research Project

The Glenmorangie Research Project on Early Medieval Scotland began in 2008 and since then has uncovered exciting new insights on this important period of Scotland’s past.
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Event
Glenmorangie Annual Lecture: Silver

Author Lindsay Shen explores the rich and eventful history of this metal that is both precious and useful.
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Blog
Rebuilding Roman silver

It’s not every day that a silver jigsaw puzzle ends up on your desk – but that’s the challenge that Principal Curator Dr Fraser Hunter and his colleagues have been facing for the past few months...
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Story
Traprain Law treasure

Buried around the middle of the 5th century AD, this hoard of Roman silver from Traprain Law in East Lothian is the largest known from outside the Roman Empire.
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Story
Hunterston brooch

This stunning brooch was found at Hunterston, Ayrshire during the 1830s. Made about AD700, it is a highly accomplished casting of silver, richly mounted with gold, silver and amber decoration.
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Exhibition information

When

13 Oct 2017 - 25 Feb 2018

Where

Exhibition Gallery 2, Level 3

How much

Free

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