Coming soon Event National Museum of Scotland

Through the Shortbread Tin: An Ossianic Journey

11 Oct 2019
19:00–20:30

Ticketed

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A work in progress by playwright and poet Martin O'Connor. Inspired by the poems of Ossian and by the story of James Macpherson, this performance in spoken word and song explores the relevance – past and present – of these epic tales in a funny and contemporary way.

Time

19:00–20:30 (doors open 18:30)

Location

Auditorium. Entry via Lothian Street.

Pricing

Adults £7, Members & Conc.* £6, Students £5 

*Over 60s, students with valid NUS or Young Scot card, unemployed with ID, disabled people. Carers of disabled people go free.

Booking information

Age 16+

Book in person at our museums, call 0300 123 6789 or book online. 

Is tlachdmmhor faclan nan òran agus aoibhneach an tseanchas.

Book showing a picture of Ossian, a bard with a long flowing beard

Above: Frontispiece of 'The Poems of Ossian in the Original Gaelic', published by the Highland Society of London.

The Red Book of Clanranald, written in Gaelic by the bards of Clanranald in the 17th and 18th centuries, containing poems and the traditional genealogy and history of the Macdonalds, one of the manuscripts which James McPherson consulted whilst researching Ossian.

The Red Book of Clanranald, written in Gaelic by the bards of Clanranald in the 17th and 18th centuries, containing poems and the traditional genealogy and history of the Macdonalds, one of the manuscripts which James McPherson consulted whilst researching Ossian.

Between 1761 and 1763, the writer James Macpherson produced three volumes of poetry from the 3rd century bard Ossian. Once declared the greatest poetry in literary history, they are now regarded as the greatest hoax.

Through spoken word and song, this performance explores the myths and realities of the poems, looks at Macpherson’s own life, and draws parallels to modern-day Scotland.

After the performance, the key themes will be explored by Martin O’Connor, curator Stuart Allan and Dr Dòmhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, University of the Highlands and Islands. There will an opportunity for audience Q&A.

A man in a green tartan shirt rehearsing theatre

Martin O'Conner in rehearsal. Photo by Alan McCredie

Martin O’Connor is a theatre maker and poet, and received the 2018 Dr Gavin Wallace Fellowship hosted by Playwright’s Studio Scotland and the Lyceum Theatre. This is the first stage in his research into James Macpherson and Ossian.

Getting here

National Museum of Scotland
Chambers Street
Edinburgh
EH1 1JF

 

Map and directions

Access

We want everyone who comes to our museums to enjoy their time with us and make the most of their visit. 

 

  • The Lothian Street entrance and Auditorium are wheelchair accessible, and there is access to an accessible toilet.
  • There is level access to the Museum via the main doors to the Entrance Hall on Chambers Street and the Tower entrance at the corner of Chambers Street and George IV Bridge. 
  • Lifts are available to all floors.
  • Accessible toilets are available on most floors, as well as a Changing Places (U) toilet in the Entrance Hall on Level 0.
  • There is also an induction loop in the Auditorium.
  • Guide dogs, hearing dogs and other recognised assistance dogs are admitted.

Find out more about our access information.

 

If you have any access requirements, please contact info@nms.ac.uk

Through the Shortbread Tin is written and performed by Martin O’Connor, with Kim Carnie, Mairi Morrison, Mischa Macpherson and Kathleen Macinnes. Music composed by Oliver Searle.

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