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Writing box Writing box

Writing box with lid, lacquered palmwood decorated with equisetum (J: tokusa) and miniature landscapes, containing internal tray with inkstone, ink-stick, silver water dropper, and two writing brushes: Japan, 18th-19th century

Sword Sword

Sword of palmwood with edges grooved and fitted with shark's teeth secured by sinnet, with band of shark's skin and coir wrist loop: Micronesian, Kiribati

Shirt Shirt

Shirt of hand-woven cotton cloth strips stitched together and dyed in brown stripes, with oblong and cylindrical shapes of palmwood covered with blue, red, black and white cotton, wool and animal skin all over and on the inside back amulets and war charms of leather covered pouches, worn by warriors and hunters for protection, part of the regalia of Kwamin Intsiaku, Chief of Sarman: West Africa, Ghana, Asante people, pre 1903

Spear Spear

Spear of palmwood, sliced to form the point, with four bands of coiled sinnet: Polynesian, Fiji

Scoop, sago Scoop, sago

Sago scoop of blackened palmwood, the handle carved with a janus-headed figure, the lines picked out with lime: Melanesia, Papua New Guinea, Huon Gulf, Tami Islands, early 19th century

Dish Dish

Dish of blackened palmwood carved to represent a shark, the lines picked out with lime: Melanesia, Papua New Guinea, Huon Gulf, Tami Islands, late 19th to early 20th century

Hat Hat

Hat of hand-woven cotton cloth strips stitched together and dyed in brown stripes with natural pigment, decorated all over with applied oblong, cylindrical and triangular amuletic shapes of palmwood covered with blue, red, black and white cotton and wool, worn by warriors and hunters for protection, part of the regalia of Kwamin Intsiaku, Chief of Sarman: West Africa, Ghana, Asante people, pre 1903

Reute ophthalmotrope Reute ophthalmotrope

Reute ophthalmotrope, model of the movements of the eyes in response to muscles, brass and wood, used at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, maker unknown, late 19th century

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