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Coffin base

Description

Base of an anthropoid coffin of yellow painted wood, of Iufenamun, priest at the temple of Karnak: Ancient Egyptian, Upper Egypt, probably from Thebes, 3rd Intermediate Period, early 22nd Dynasty, c. 967 - 900 BC

Museum reference

A.1907.569

Collection

World Culture

Object name

Coffin base

Production information

Unknown
Egypt, Northern Africa

Date

3rd Intermediate Period
Early 22nd Dynasty

Style / Culture

22nd Dynasty, 3rd Intermediate Period, Ancient Egyptian

Materials

Wood

Physical description

Wood, yellow painted

Collection place(s)

Thebes, Upper Egypt, Egypt, Northern Africa

Associations

Depicted: Iufenamun
Previous owner: Sir Colin Scott-Moncrieff

Exhibitions

  • Discoveries Redisplay, 2015

  • Discoveries (29 Jul 2011 - 2016)
    National Museum of Scotland

  • The Journey Beyond (07 May 2010 - 28 Aug 2010)
    Dick Institute

References

NIWINSKI, A. (1988): 21st Dynasty Coffins from Thebes: Chronological and Typological Studies. Theben 5 (Mainz: Philipp von Zabern).p.138[183]

Howell G. M. Edwards, Susana E. Jorge Villar, Katherine A. Eremin, (2004) 'Raman spectroscopic analysis of pigments from dynastic Egyptian funerary artefacts', Journal of Raman Spectroscopy 35/8‐9 (Raman spectroscopy in Art and Archaeology, August ‐ September 2004), 786-795.

MANLEY, W. P. (2006): ‘The Identity of an Important Priest in the Collections of the National Museums of Scotland’, in SOLKIN, V. V. (ed.), Ancient Egypt, 2. On the Occasion of the 150th Birthday Anniversary of Vladimir S. Golenischeff (Moscow and St Petersburg: Maat) pp. 71-6.

Manley, B and Dodson, A., (2010) Life Everlasting. National Museums Scotland Collection of Ancient Egyptian Coffins (Edinburgh: NMS Enterprises Ltd.), pp. 47-51

COONEY, K., (2021), ' A Case Study of Multiple Coffin Reuse in the National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh', in Barbash, Y. Cooney, K.M. (eds.) Afterlives of Egyptian History: A Festschrift for Edward Bleiberg, Cairo: American University in Cairo Press

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