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Accessibility

We want everyone who comes to our museums to have a safe and enjoyable visit.

Changes to your visit

We've made some changes to make visiting the museum safe and enjoyable for our visitors and our staff. Find out more on our Plan Your Visit page.

Getting around the museum

We want everyone who comes to our museums to have a safe and enjoyable visit.

A walk from the museum to the farm takes about ten minutes on paths overlooking the fields and hedgerows. Farm Explorer tractor-trailer ride tickets are available at the museum ticket desk. Tickets are on a first-come first-served basis with limited availability each day. The last tractor to the farm departs at 16:00.

  • Outdoor paths to the farm have firm, rough gravel surfaces with moderate slopes in some areas, suitable for pushchairs and electric assist wheelchairs or strong helper.
  • Steep slope and uneven terrain between farmhouse garden and kitchen garden can be avoided by following accessible route marked on the site map.
  • Distance between museum building and farm steading is approximately half a mile.
  • Footwear appropriate for outdoors and inclement weather is recommended for visiting the farm.
  • The museum galleries and displays are accessible via lifts and a continuous ramp at a gradient of 1:16.
  • There is seating throughout the main museum building and at regular intervals on the walk to the farm.
  • Assistance dogs are welcome in the museum buildings and on the outdoor site.

Our full access guide can be found at the AccessAble website.

Download a map of the National Museum of Rural Life or pick one up at our information desk when you arrive.

Free entry for carers

Disabled visitors pay a concession for admission, with a carer accompanying for free.

Accessible parking

There is ample free parking at the site, with four designated spaces for disabled visitors near the entrance.

BSL Service

Deaf BSL (British Sign Language) users can make contact using the free ContactSCOTLAND-BSL service.

 

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