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Lennoxlove toilet service

One of our greatest treasures, the Lennoxlove toilet service was discovered at Lennoxlove, a towerhouse near Haddington, to the east of Edinburgh, shortly after the death of the 12th and last Lord Blantyre in 1900.

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The power of social media

The use of social media platforms in promoting entomological collections.

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Dr Rebekah Higgitt

Dr Rebekah Higgitt is the Principal Curator of Science

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Crozier and Coigreach of St Fillan

This beautiful medieval bishop’s crook and silver-gilt case, or Coigreach, are associated with St Fillan of Perthshire, and are among our most important medieval church artefacts.

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LGBTQIA+ Hidden Histories Trail

Discover unexplored stories in our new audio trail

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来館案内

スコットランド国立博物館来館案内

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Fossil Discovery Sheds New Light on Early Turtle Evolution

A 228 million year old fossilised turtle is helping scientists fill a key gap in their understanding of the evolution of the group.

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Frances Farquharson's tartan suit

This dramatic suit was worn by the flamboyant fashion editor turned Highland society hostess Frances Farquharson.

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Enchroma glasses

These simple-looking glasses hold a secret power: they allow people with red-green colour blindness to experience colours which they would normally be unable to see.

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A glance at Scotland’s national animal

The unicorn is first mentioned in a long lost book about India about 400 BC and eventually is adopted as Scotland's national animal in the 15th century and can now be seen everywhere.

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Chains II tapestry designed by Archie Brennan.
Chains tapestry

Huge chains strike the eye with a comic book grandeur. Yet this is no comic or Pop Art painting but an Archie Brennan tapestry from 1977 entitled Chains.

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Illustrating Egyptian excavations: Annie Pirie Quibell

Aberdeen-born Annie Pirie was one of the first women in the United Kingdom to study Egyptology. Discover how this trained artist and pioneering archaeologist has left a lasting legacy.

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Pistols belonging to Robert Burns

This prized set of pistols belonged to Robert Burns, Scotland's national Bard. Find out why.

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An ancient grey whale: A first for Norway

Unlocking the secrets of archaeological whale bone.

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Gold object of the week No. 4

Ystradowen finger ingot

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Egypt, Past and Present in Dialogue

Discuss the legacies of British archaeological practices in Egypt at a panel discussion chaired by journalist, writer and broadcaster Samira Ahmed.

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In Conversation: Inspiring Walter Scott

Join our curators to explore the fascinating objects that inspired Sir Walter Scott and the celebrated novels in which they feature.

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Gold weights from Ghana

These small objects were essential tools for trade in West Africa until the end of the 19th century.

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Dr Evelyn Baxter and Miss Leonora Rintoul

Meet 'the good ladies' of bird collecting, two pioneering ornithologists whose work is still influential today.

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Fossil embryo

An exquisitely preserved fossil of an embryo of extinct marine reptile has been described from China from rocks that are about 245 million years old.

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Scotland's Early Silver

This exhibition explored the impact of silver during the first millennium AD.

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Bibliography

Find out more about the history of wood engraving, illustration and publishing in the 19th century.

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Egypt's Dispersed Heritage

Explore the legacies of the British archaeology in Egypt and the dialogue being created around these collections.

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Gold object of the week No. 6

The Colaton Raleigh Hoard, Devon

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Brains and behaviour

A new study into brains and behaviour in extinct mammals and birds.

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Kabuki

This striking exhibition presented vivid depictions of Kabuki, the popular form of traditional, all-male Japanese theatre, from our Japanese woodblock print collection.

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Meissen lion

The Meissen lion is part of the animal menagerie commissioned by Augustus II the Strong in the early 18th century.

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Invertebrates

Our collections date from the mid-1800s and include samples of many different groups of animals.

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The Circular Economy

Discover more about the Circular Economy through the Making Circles schools project, led by Ostrero.

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Hand-bells

Brazing an iron hand-bell in bronze has been the most technologically challenging of all the craft recreations, reinforcing our appreciation of the skill of Early Medieval craftspeople.

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Library collection

The scope of the library collection reflects the strengths and variety of the Museums’ collections.

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Gold object of the week No. 2

Gold lunulae from Harlyn Bay, Cornwall

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Unwrapping the Galloway Hoard

“Unwrapping the Galloway Hoard” is a 3-year AHRC project in partnership with the University of Glasgow that aims to challenge current understanding of the process of hoarding through an interdisciplinary study of one of the best-preserved hoards found in Britain to date.

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How to make a Recyclesaurus

Make your own upcycled dinosaur from left over cardboard. How about creating a terrific T Rex, a stunning Stegosaursus or a dapper Diplodocus?

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James VI and I

James VI and I was a hugely significant Stewart king, but has been overshadowed by his notorious relations: his predecessor in Scotland, his mother, Mary, Queen of Scots; in England, his cousin, Elizabeth I; and his successor in both kingdoms, Charles I.

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EMAS: The first bionic arm

Scotland Creates volunteer Aileen Miller explains why this pioneering Edinburgh Modular Arm System (EMAS) is so awesome

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Box of Amenhotep II

This box inscribed with the name of Pharaoh Amenhotep II is one of the finest examples of decorative woodwork to survive from ancient Egypt.

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Atalanta and Hippomenes overmantel

Discover the history of a 17th-century stone carving which reflects changing tastes in interior design through the years.

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Napier's bones

Napier’s ‘bones’ or ‘rods’ are just one of the methods invented by the Edinburgh-born Renaissance scholar John Napier to speed up calculations.

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J R Pairman: from wood engraver to art director

Born in 1837, John (sometimes James) Ramsay Pairman began working for W. & R. Chambers in 1858. During his 50 year tenure, he rose from wood engraver to superintendent of the Illustrating Department by 1866 and acted as the firm’s Art Editor.

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Dr Alice Blackwell

Alice is the Curator of Medieval Archaeology & History, with responsibility for the late medieval collections.

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African Commemorative Textiles Project with Edinburgh College of Art 2016-17

This creative project opened up our African collections as an inspirational resource for students at Edinburgh College of Art.

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Scottish wildcat

Rarer than the tiger, the Scottish wildcat is Britain's last native cat species. Find out more about this elusive feline and the efforts being made to ensure it has a future.

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Teacup Travels

Download resources to create your own Teacup Travels adventure, based on the CBeebies series, and find out where you can see the objects that inspired the Viking episode.

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Triumph of Prudence tapestry

Hung in Europe’s most noble households, this luxurious tapestry belongs to a Flemish set known as The Triumph of the Seven Virtues. It was woven in Brussels during the early 16th century.

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Lulu the killer whale

Lulu came from the only killer whale pod in the UK and was found dead on Tiree in 2016. She had the highest levels of polychlorinated biphenyls ever recorded from a marine mammal.

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Jacobite heroine: Snuffbox associated with Flora MacDonald

Flora MacDonald famously helped Bonnie Prince Charlie escape. This snuffbox, an heirloom of her clan, links the romantic pair.

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