These silver spoons were from a cutlery service bought by Assistant Surgeon Stewart Chisholm using prize money awarded to him for his service at the Battle of Waterloo.

Silvers spoons fact file

Date

1817-1818

Made from

Silver

Museum reference

H.MEQ 1505

On display

Active Service, Gallery 6, National War Museum

Did you know?

Prize money from the Battle of Waterloo was shared out among the victorious allied armies.

Silver spoons bought using prize money from The Battle Of Waterloo

Who did these spoons belong to?

The spoons are stamped with the family crest of Assistant Surgeon Stewart Chisholm, his initials and the words ‘Waterloo Prize Money’, showing his pride in the source of his expensive cutlery service. They were made in 1817 0r 1818 by Edinburgh goldsmiths Chalres Dalgleish.

As a 21-year-old assistant surgeon serving with the Ordnance Medical Department, Chisholm would have been entitled to sum of around £35, equivalent to nearly £1,500 in today’s terms.

Silver Spoons bought using prize money from the Battle Of Waterloo

Where did the prize money come from?

Prize money was shared out among the victorious allied armies, from a huge cash indemnity which France was required to pay under the terms of the Treaty of Paris. The prize money was divided up according to rank. A general officer received over £1,250; a private soldier received £2.11s.4d.

What happened Stewart Chisholm?

In later life Chisholm saw active service again during the 1837 rebellions in Canada. He retired in 1858 as Senior Surgeon in the Royal Artillery and Deputy Inspector-General of Army Hospitals.

More like this

Tags

Back to top

Discover the story of Scottish pop music as we take you on a musical journey from the 1950s to the present day in our new exhibition.

Members go free!

Book now